Are the Over 60s Spending More on Cosmetic Surgery

Are the Over 60s Spending More on Cosmetic Surgery?

Recent research from The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) found that ‘tweaked, not tucked’ has become the new ideal for many. Research has shown that there has been an increase in the number of people over the age of 60 undergoing plastic surgery treatments. Additionally, research from The Independent Pensions Advisory Service (TPAS) found pensioners have been informing their advisers they would like to spend the money on cosmetic surgery such as breast enlargement, face lifts, and dental implants.

The reason suggested behind this increase in the over 60s undergoing cosmetic treatments is that many people are looking for a little extra help to match how they feel with how they look. People are living longer and are in better health, many older adults are exercising on a regular basis and tying to stay fit. All of us want to look as good as we feel, and this may mean a nip and tuck here and there.

Another factor affecting the increase in patients over the age of 60 has to do with people working longer these days. Many older adults are not fully retired and want to spend their pensions and extra cash on themselves to make them feel happier in their body. An article on Real Self interviewed an elderly lady who was shocked by her aged appearance and wanted to change her exterior to match the age she felt inside. This notion of wanting to look as good as we feel seems to be the driving factor behind older adults undergoing plastic surgery, and many are feeling much better having done so.

There have been questions raised surrounding older adults undergoing elective surgery at their age, but many professionals have addressed these questions. As with any surgery, it is important for the patient to be in good health before undergoing an operation, and just because a person is older, doesn’t mean they’re in poor health. How healthy a person is doesn’t always depend on physical age, as long as the person leads a healthy lifestyle then being over 60 does not mean that they are at an increased risk during surgery.